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Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

NovaScotiaDuckTolling

A Playful Pet

Loves to retrieve, Playful, Sporting group

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are extraordinary pets. While it is interesting to learn about the breeding purpose of Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers, their genetics actually influence health, outward appearance and behavior. Some behaviors make the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever and some can be quite irritating! Understanding her unique needs will help you keep her healthy and will create a stronger bond between the two of you. Explore this page to learn more about where she came, which health conditions are a risk to her and how to keep her feeling her best.


Breed Details

Height:17-21" Weight:35-52 lbs Lifespan:11-13 years

Size
3

1=small 5=large

Grooming requirements
2

1 = little grooming - 5 = much grooming

Energy level
5

1 = low energy - 5 = high energy

Ease of training
4

1 = difficult - 5 = easy

Affection toward owners
5

1 = independent - 5 = very affectionate

Friendliness toward strangers
3

1 = shy - 5 = very friendly

Routine Care: A Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a smart dog with lots of energy, so keep her mind and body active, or she'll get bored. She loves the water, and swimming is a great form of exercise for your Toller. She is an energetic and active dog that excels at canine sports like agility, obedience, and flyball.

Grooming: Brush her coat as needed, at least weekly.

Dental: Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers generally have good teeth, and you can keep them perfect by brushing them at least twice a week!

Ear Care: Clean her ears weekly, even as a puppy. Don’t worry—your veterinarian can show you how!


A Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a devoted and outgoing family companion. She is always ready for action and would love to play fetch for hours.

Positive Traits:

  • Highly intelligent, playful, and energetic

  • Friendly and eager to please

  • Great with kids and other dogs: a true family pet

  • Loves to play games, especially fetch

  • Sensible watchdog

  • Even-tempered; adapts to a wide variety of environments

Negative Traits:

  • Easily bored or distracted if not given something to do

  • Needs a lot of exercise and mental stimulation

  • Is a bit “mouthy”—likes to carry and chew things

  • Can be rambunctious and rowdy, especially as a puppy

  • Can be independent and strong-willed

  • Has a tendency to bark or howl when excited or faced with the unfamiliar

Whether you are considering adding a new Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever to your family or you already have one as a companion, it is important for you to know about the genetically linked diseases known to occur more often in this breed. Of course not every Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever will have these problems, but research shows your pal is more at risk than other breeds.

By exploring the health concerns specific to the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever you will become a knowledgeable and confident pet parent. Be sure to speak with your veterinarian about breed risks every time you visit and educate yourself on the most important signs to watch for at home. She’s counting on you to be her health expert.

Some health issues a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever could encounter:

Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's)

Lupus

Eye Problems

Cataracts

Distichiasis

Blindness

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever originated in southwestern Nova Scotia in the early 19th century. They were bred to lure waterfowl to the water’s edge and then retrieve them for their owner. The Toller is the official dog of the Canadian Province of Nova Scotia. They are the smallest of the retriever type dogs and are affectionately called “the little red dog.” Tollers are intense while working, but are affectionate and easy-going at home. They are highly intelligent dogs that need short and fun training sessions and a job to perform. NSDTR’s are known to have a high-pitched “scream” that they use to display excitement or eagerness.

Consult with a veterinarian if your Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever shows signs of the following:

  • General listlessness, droopy facial expression, vomiting, diarrhea

  • Skin sores, shifting leg lameness

  • Blinking, redness, pain or itchiness around the eyes

  • Cloudiness to eye lens

  • Increased blinking, extra tears and squinting

  • Dilated pupils in daylight, or increased "eye shine" at night

  • Vision impairment

  • General reluctance to run or play

  • Any abnormal shaking, trembling, or excessive involuntary tremors

  • Dull coat, hair loss, sluggish, weight gain

  • Shortness of breath, cough, or fainting

  • Easily startled, no reaction to unseen sounds

  • Soft, non-painful bulge near the belly button

  • Care

    Routine Care: A Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a smart dog with lots of energy, so keep her mind and body active, or she'll get bored. She loves the water, and swimming is a great form of exercise for your Toller. She is an energetic and active dog that excels at canine sports like agility, obedience, and flyball.

    Grooming: Brush her coat as needed, at least weekly.

    Dental: Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers generally have good teeth, and you can keep them perfect by brushing them at least twice a week!

    Ear Care: Clean her ears weekly, even as a puppy. Don’t worry—your veterinarian can show you how!


  • Characteristics

    A Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a devoted and outgoing family companion. She is always ready for action and would love to play fetch for hours.

    Positive Traits:

    • Highly intelligent, playful, and energetic

    • Friendly and eager to please

    • Great with kids and other dogs: a true family pet

    • Loves to play games, especially fetch

    • Sensible watchdog

    • Even-tempered; adapts to a wide variety of environments

    Negative Traits:

    • Easily bored or distracted if not given something to do

    • Needs a lot of exercise and mental stimulation

    • Is a bit “mouthy”—likes to carry and chew things

    • Can be rambunctious and rowdy, especially as a puppy

    • Can be independent and strong-willed

    • Has a tendency to bark or howl when excited or faced with the unfamiliar

  • Health Concerns

    Whether you are considering adding a new Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever to your family or you already have one as a companion, it is important for you to know about the genetically linked diseases known to occur more often in this breed. Of course not every Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever will have these problems, but research shows your pal is more at risk than other breeds.

    By exploring the health concerns specific to the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever you will become a knowledgeable and confident pet parent. Be sure to speak with your veterinarian about breed risks every time you visit and educate yourself on the most important signs to watch for at home. She’s counting on you to be her health expert.

    Some health issues a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever could encounter:

    Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's)

    Lupus

    Eye Problems

    Cataracts

    Distichiasis

    Blindness

  • History

    The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever originated in southwestern Nova Scotia in the early 19th century. They were bred to lure waterfowl to the water’s edge and then retrieve them for their owner. The Toller is the official dog of the Canadian Province of Nova Scotia. They are the smallest of the retriever type dogs and are affectionately called “the little red dog.” Tollers are intense while working, but are affectionate and easy-going at home. They are highly intelligent dogs that need short and fun training sessions and a job to perform. NSDTR’s are known to have a high-pitched “scream” that they use to display excitement or eagerness.

  • Watch Out For

    Consult with a veterinarian if your Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever shows signs of the following:

    • General listlessness, droopy facial expression, vomiting, diarrhea

    • Skin sores, shifting leg lameness

    • Blinking, redness, pain or itchiness around the eyes

    • Cloudiness to eye lens

    • Increased blinking, extra tears and squinting

    • Dilated pupils in daylight, or increased "eye shine" at night

    • Vision impairment

    • General reluctance to run or play

    • Any abnormal shaking, trembling, or excessive involuntary tremors

    • Dull coat, hair loss, sluggish, weight gain

    • Shortness of breath, cough, or fainting

    • Easily startled, no reaction to unseen sounds

    • Soft, non-painful bulge near the belly button

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Discussions

Share your thoughts and experiences, ask questions, or just show your love for the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever breed here!

Select Another Breed

To view the sources for the information listed on this page, see our Dog Breed Guide Reference page.

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