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Pyrenean Shepherd

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A Clever Little Athlete

Energetic, obedient, alert

Pyrenean Shepherds are easily motivated, active, and lively medium-sized dogs. These vocal shepherds get along with other animals, but are typically wary of strangers. This breed is prone to boredom, and should not be left alone for long periods of time. Pyrenean Shepherds make great companions for large and busy families that can give them a purpose. They need plenty of exercise to stay content, such as a long walk and vigorous play every day.

Understanding their unique needs will help keep them healthy and create a strong bond between the two of you. Explore this page to learn more about the breed’s history, health concerns, characteristics, and care needs.

Breed Details

Height:15-21 in. Weight:15-32 lb Lifespan:9-12 years

Size
3

1=small 5=large

Grooming requirements
2

1 = little grooming - 5 = much grooming

Energy level
4

1 = low energy - 5 = high energy

Ease of training
4

1 = difficult - 5 = easy

Affection toward owners
5

1 = independent - 5 = very affectionate

Friendliness toward strangers
2

1 = shy - 5 = very friendly

Routine care: Naturally a bit wary, Pyrenean Shepherds can be distrustful of strangers; bond them to children early to trigger protective behaviors.

Grooming: Brush their coat weekly, and don't do much else. The hair over the rump tends to form cords; this is okay even in the show ring. Don't forget to trim their double rear dewclaws!

Dental: Pyrenean Shepherds generally have good teeth, but you can keep them perfect by brushing them at least twice a week.

Ear care: Clean their ears weekly, even as a puppy. Don't worry — your veterinary will show you how!

Pyrenean Shepherds tend to be dominant-aggressive, which can be a problem if they don't have a strong leader who keeps them busy. They often form close bonds with one person in the family.

Positive Traits:

  • Lively with a friendly personality

  • Easily motivated and trainable

  • Highly active and eager for a purpose

  • Requires minimal grooming

Negative Traits:

  • Wary of strangers with a tendency to vocalize

  • Needs a lot of activity and mental stimulation to avoid boredom vices

  • Has a tendency to herd, including small children


Whether you are considering adding a new Pyrenean Shepherd to your family or you already have one as a companion, it is important for you to know about the genetically linked diseases known to occur more often in this breed. Of course not every Pyrenean Shepherd will have these problems, but research shows your pal is more at risk than other breeds. 

By exploring the health concerns specific to the Pyrenean Shepherd, you will become a knowledgeable and confident pet owner. Be sure to speak with your veterinarian about breed risks every time you visit and educate yourself on the most important signs to watch for at home. They are counting on you to be their health expert.

Some health issues a Pyrenean Shepherd could encounter:

Some think the small dogs in Lascaux cave paintings are this clever little breed. Could they have been hanging out with Cro-Magnon cave dwellers 25,000 years ago? Archeologists are uncertain, but medieval records and paintings of these little sheepdogs indicate they have been in the Pyrenean mountains in southern France for the last 6,000 years. They are still there today doing the same job, at which they are exceptionally talented. With the giant Great Pyrenees dog standing guard, this quick, sure-footed, little herder works the flock in safety. If you have a large and busy family instead of a flock of sheep, this dog fits right in. They bark often, love constant activity, and thrive in a tumultuous environment, especially if they have a job. Boredom may lead to naughty behavior, but grooming is easy-peasy, just a quick brushing once a week will do. Pyrenean Shepherds are generally a hardy and carefree breed, but they are prone to hip and eye problems.

Signs to watch out for are coming soon for the Pyrenean Shepherd.

  • Care

    Routine care: Naturally a bit wary, Pyrenean Shepherds can be distrustful of strangers; bond them to children early to trigger protective behaviors.

    Grooming: Brush their coat weekly, and don't do much else. The hair over the rump tends to form cords; this is okay even in the show ring. Don't forget to trim their double rear dewclaws!

    Dental: Pyrenean Shepherds generally have good teeth, but you can keep them perfect by brushing them at least twice a week.

    Ear care: Clean their ears weekly, even as a puppy. Don't worry — your veterinary will show you how!

  • Characteristics

    Pyrenean Shepherds tend to be dominant-aggressive, which can be a problem if they don't have a strong leader who keeps them busy. They often form close bonds with one person in the family.

    Positive Traits:

    • Lively with a friendly personality

    • Easily motivated and trainable

    • Highly active and eager for a purpose

    • Requires minimal grooming

    Negative Traits:

    • Wary of strangers with a tendency to vocalize

    • Needs a lot of activity and mental stimulation to avoid boredom vices

    • Has a tendency to herd, including small children


  • Health Concerns

    Whether you are considering adding a new Pyrenean Shepherd to your family or you already have one as a companion, it is important for you to know about the genetically linked diseases known to occur more often in this breed. Of course not every Pyrenean Shepherd will have these problems, but research shows your pal is more at risk than other breeds. 

    By exploring the health concerns specific to the Pyrenean Shepherd, you will become a knowledgeable and confident pet owner. Be sure to speak with your veterinarian about breed risks every time you visit and educate yourself on the most important signs to watch for at home. They are counting on you to be their health expert.

    Some health issues a Pyrenean Shepherd could encounter:

  • History

    Some think the small dogs in Lascaux cave paintings are this clever little breed. Could they have been hanging out with Cro-Magnon cave dwellers 25,000 years ago? Archeologists are uncertain, but medieval records and paintings of these little sheepdogs indicate they have been in the Pyrenean mountains in southern France for the last 6,000 years. They are still there today doing the same job, at which they are exceptionally talented. With the giant Great Pyrenees dog standing guard, this quick, sure-footed, little herder works the flock in safety. If you have a large and busy family instead of a flock of sheep, this dog fits right in. They bark often, love constant activity, and thrive in a tumultuous environment, especially if they have a job. Boredom may lead to naughty behavior, but grooming is easy-peasy, just a quick brushing once a week will do. Pyrenean Shepherds are generally a hardy and carefree breed, but they are prone to hip and eye problems.

  • Watch Out For

    Signs to watch out for are coming soon for the Pyrenean Shepherd.

Pyrenean Shepherd Discussions

Share your thoughts and experiences, ask questions, or just show your love for the Pyrenean Shepherd breed here!

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